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In the wilderness lies the preservation of the world.
Henry David Thoreau

Entering the Toba Valley – Grizzlytour Day 4

Now, things get serious. We go into the wilderness. Away from everything that reminds us of civilization, where we will be the only humans in a radius of 70 kilometers. This is where we want to go. We leave the harbor in Campbell river at 9:30am with the water taxi out to the open ocean. There,  we meet Kai, David und Tobi, who, in the early morning, had already been underway with Cambell River Whale Watching in order to negotiate another forest protection cooperation. Successfully.  After everyone boards and we begin our journey, we see a fountain spurting out of the water. It’s a humpback whale! Immediately afterwards we see the humped back, then the fin. It dives and is gone, but the fantastic memory remains. Christian sums up the trip: “In the beginning everything is cool. There are buildings on every island and it looks really cozy. But slowly the islands become less populated, and only rarely does one see a small house. And when we turn into the Toba fjord, there is nothing. We are really the only humans out here.” We unload the supplies from the water taxi on to the expedition jet boat, and before we know it we are on the Toba river. We shuttle the group in 2s and 3s, with our luggage, up the river. The water level is low, very low, and we have to negotiate around the sand banks in the middle of the narrow waterway. But something is different: it does not stink like it did two years ago, when we first came in the autumn to watch the bears hunting salmon. And we also do not see any dead salmon. Our goal for today: a sand bank along a curve in the river, which is flanked on both sides by a waterfall, offering a spectacular picture. We reach the sand bank as the sun slowly sets. The tents are quickly set up and the campfire is burning. What’s for dinner? Potatos and sausages. Yum! Good night!

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